AMD Ryzen finally makes octo-core processors affordable

After months of rumors , leaks and teasing from AMD itself , Ryzen has finally risen and it’s the company’s most impressive processor lineup yet.

AMD is on a mission to bring high performance CPUs to the market and challenge Intel, so it has introduced a trio Ryzen 7 chips, its highest-end lineup of CPUs. Starting with the flagship, the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X features 8-cores and 16-threads, as well as a 3.6GHz base speed and top speeds of up to 4GHz.

Based on AMD’s first ultra-small 14nm (nanometer) FinFET architecture, the flagship CPU achieves 52% more instructions per clock than AMD’s previous chips – so it’s both smaller and quicker. Performance-wise, AMD claims the Ryzen 7 1800X scored 1,601 points in the Cinebench R15 NT benchmark, beating the Intel Core i7-6900K’s 1,474 score.

The AMD Ryzen 7 1800X will be available for pre-orders for $499 (about £400, AU$650) – or about half as much as the $1,049 (about £999, AU$1,499) you would spend on the 6900K – starting today, and will arrive to shelves on March 2nd.

Triple threat

Just below the Ryzen 7 1800X, AMD also announced the 1700X at an introductory $399 (about £320, AU$520). This 95-Watt TDP processor comes with the same cores and threads as its bigger brother, while clocking in at 3.4GHz for its base speed and a boosted frequency of 3.8GHz.

With a Cinebench R15 nT score of 1,537 points it competes with the Core i7-6900K and Intel’s lower-end processors.

Last but not least, the Ryzen 7 1700 comes at an astounding value for $329 (about £260, AU$430). Not only do you get 8-cores and 16-threads as with all other Ryzen 7 chips, it runs pretty quick at a 3.0GHz base clock (3.7GHz boost clock), helping it to puts up a decent Cinebench R15 nT score of 1,410.

Comparatively, Intel’s competing Core i7-7700K processor posted 967 points in the same test and goes for $349 (£339, AU$479).

How to get Windows 10 to stop asking you for feedback

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Microsoft’s Windows 10 is a great operating system, but it’s far from perfect. In fact, it has a few outright annoying features—the list of which varies by user. Lately, we’ve been hearing that one of those annoyances has been rearing its ugly head far too often: Windows Feedback.

It’s great that Microsoft wants to hear directly from its users, but the operating system’s begging prompts pop-up far too often. Besides, if you’ve really got something to say, Windows 10 has the built-in Windows Feedback app you can fire up any time to contribute your opinion.

Here’s how to turn off Windows 10’s automated requests for feedback.

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Click Start > Settings to open the Settings app and click on Privacy. On the next screen, select Feedback & diagnostics from the left hand navigation pane.

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At the top of the Feedback and diagnostics window you’ll see the “Feedback frequency” heading, and a drop down menu beneath “Windows should ask for my feedback.” By default, the drop down says Automatically (Recommended), which is not what we want. Click the drop down and you’ll see a  number of options—most importantly Never, which is right at the bottom.

Select that, close the app, and you’re done with Microsoft’s feedback requests.